Fine Art Prints Are Now Available!

I’m happy to announce that I finally have a selection of my work in the Saatchi Art store. Fine art prints of my photographs are now available in various canvas and print sizes. There are framing options available as well. I will be updating the portfolio frequently. Please take a moment to browse the current selection of images by clicking below!

Nikon 200-500 f5.6 VR Lens One Year Later

It’s been just over a year since I got my hands on what has become an essential part of my lens arsenal. The Nikon 200-500mm f5.6 VR is probably my favourite lens for wildlife. It’s so versatile. Though the newer 500mm f5.6E PF is tempting me, it lacks the versatile zoom range of the 200-500mm (and it’s twice the price). I’ve used the 200-500mm f5.6 VR for the vast majority of my wildlife shots (and a lot of landscapes as well) over the last year. I’d like to celebrate this anniversary by sharing a few of my favourite shots that I’ve made using this lens. You can read my full review by clicking here.
Thanks for reading and happy shooting!

Grizzly grazing in the estuary, Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f6.3, 1/800 sec, ISO 4000)

Grizzly grazing in the estuary, Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f6.3, 1/800 sec, ISO 4000)

Grizzly cub resting by the estuary in low tide, Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f6.3, 1/800 sec, ISO 2500)

Grizzly cub resting by the estuary in low tide, Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f6.3, 1/800 sec, ISO 2500)

Mountain goat nanny and kid looking over the Athabasca River, Jasper National Park (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f.8, 1/2500 sec, ISO 500)

Mountain goat nanny and kid looking over the Athabasca River, Jasper National Park (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f.8, 1/2500 sec, ISO 500)

Bison shaking off snow, Elk Island National Park (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 290mm, f8, 1/400 sec, ISO 800)

Bison shaking off snow, Elk Island National Park (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 290mm, f8, 1/400 sec, ISO 800)

Canada goose goslings, Elk Island National Park (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f8, 1/800 sec, ISO 400)

Canada goose goslings, Elk Island National Park (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f8, 1/800 sec, ISO 400)

White-tailed Jackrabbits, Alberta, Canada (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 290mm, f7.1, 1/1600 sec, ISO 400)

White-tailed Jackrabbits, Alberta, Canada (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 290mm, f7.1, 1/1600 sec, ISO 400)

Elk in snow, Banff National Park (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 1800)

Elk in snow, Banff National Park (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 1800)

My Top Travel Tips...

My Top Travel Tips (For All Types of Travellers)

I just started breaking ground on my next ebook on travel photography. It got me thinking about some things I’ve learned, not only about photography, but about travel in general over the last several years. I’d like to share a few of those tips with you; these are practical and apply to everyone. They’ll not only make your travel experience better, but also make you a more efficient image maker. You’ve spent a lot of time planning and a bit of money getting to your destination, this is how you get the most out it.

Spend More Time, Less Money.

It’s easier than ever to go on amazing trips on a budget using sites like Airbnb.com and Booking.com. Make sure you’re spending enough time at your destination to soak it all in. Don’t rush around from one site to the next trying to pack in a lot on a tight schedule. I like to book enough time to really get to know a place; greater understanding of your destination enhances your experience and increases your chances of getting meaningful and unique images (instead of forgettable snap shots).

The less money you spend on your day-to-day, the longer you can stay. Set a reasonable, yet lean, budget for your trip. Research the best local (and cheap) eateries like hell before you go. I (almost) always book Airbnbs with kitchens so that I can cook most of my meals instead of eating out two or three times a day. Shopping at grocery stores and markets like the locals will save you money, and give you a better understanding of what it’s like to live there. Make sure you’re centrally located too, so you don’t have to travel far and spend a lot money on transit. Paying a few bucks more per night in that downtown Airbnb might be cheaper than cabs, Ubers, and public transit from the big chain hotel on the edge of town.

Click here for my post on How to Afford to Travel.

Pack Less.

For the love of everything you hold holy take less crap with you! I carry one 35L backpack with everything I need, including camera gear, for up to two weeks on the road. It doesn’t matter if I’m going to the Canadian Rockies just 3 hours from my home or if I’m flying to Europe and visiting multiple countries, I only take one bag. I know what you’re thinking…“That’s easy for you! You’re a young dude willing to rough it for good pictures!” My wife only takes one 34L backpack and her purse as a personal item. That’s it. She always looks good! We never check anything when flying.

I find that minimalist packing relieves some of the stress of being in transit. Despite my love of visiting new places, I hate being in transit. With me, it’s the destination, not the journey. By packing one carry-on bag, I have less to keep up with and can get around airports and train stations more efficiently: no waiting for my checked luggage to be rechecked and risk missing a flight; no worrying that luggage will be lost or damaged (which happened to me in past before I knew better).

Click here to see my Travel Photographer’s Master Packing List.

Wear Good Shoes.

Sturdy, practical, and comfortable walking/hiking shoes are essential. Break them in before you go. Say you’re spending a week in Paris or Prague: those cobblestone streets are gonna tear your tootsies up if you’re not wearing the right footwear. Make sure to start walking in your main pair (especially if they’re new) several days to a couple weeks before your trip to make sure you break them in and to know in advance if they’re going to cause blisters. Blisters can ruin a trip.
Pro Tip: Pack a little coconut oil to rub in between your toes each day. It’ll help relieve friction and help prevent blisters.

I have a couple different foot issues I battle with about every time I travel. It’s frustrating. Being a photographer means I have to be mobile and need the ability to walk several miles a day. Gradually, I’m learning how to deal with these issues. You can save yourself a huge amount of woe and discomfort simply by picking the right shoes. I’d recommend a good hiking shoe brand; trail runners that are breathable are great for summer. Whatever you choose, make sure they’re not gonna hold you back. Accept function over fashion and save yourself some serious aches and pains.

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Behind the Image: Sun, Oak, and Marsh

This photograph was not an accident. I did not coincidentally happen upon this beautiful oak just as the sun was about to set on the horizon. Happy accidents are very rare in photography. This image was the result of planning, scouting, and timing. I’m afraid that most people have this idea that photographers walk about aimlessly with their expensive gear and picture opportunities just jump out at them. Then the camera does all the work, right? Nice gear equals nice pics? Not at all. I can’t stress that point enough.

I was recovering from my recent surgery down on the North/South Carolina border near the coast over the holidays and getting very tired of sitting around. I had my camera gear in my backpack and decided to take a drive early one morning and arrived just before sunrise at Sunset Beach, North Carolina. It was surprisingly chilly weather for the low country, but it was great to be out doing my thing again (see images from this outing in the previous post). After my time on the beach, I drove over the border to Vereen Gardens in Little River, South Carolina.

I’d been there before and remembered all the old oaks that hang over the marsh. I remembered the moss swaying from the branches. It seemed like it would be a great area for landscape photographs. Unfortunately, I’d spent so much time on the beach, the sun was too high for the image I imagined. I wanted the trees to be backlit and the moss to have nice rim lighting. I decided to watch the weather forecasts and return one evening when the sun would set behind this particularly interesting tree.

An old oak by the intracoastal marsh, near Little River, South Carolina. (18mm, f16, 1/40 sec, ISO 100, tripod)

An old oak by the intracoastal marsh, near Little River, South Carolina. (18mm, f16, 1/40 sec, ISO 100, tripod)

On a clear evening I drove back over to Vereen Gardens with a particular shot in mind. I walked the wooded trails through the marshes to the old oak that I found most interesting. I knew exactly where the sun would rest briefly on the horizon before slipping behind it. There would be only a couple minutes to compose the shot. In order to get a perfect “sun star” I had to wait until the sun was just touching the horizon, then I had to compose the frame (with my tripod in several inches of black mud) so that the light poked through the branches in an aesthetically pleasing spot. I used a narrow aperture of f16 to help give the rays of sunlight more definition. Despite the high contrast in this scene (the extreme brightness and extremely dark shadows), I ended up not having to use exposure bracketing. I bracketed several exposures anyway, but the dead-centre exposure was balanced enough that there was plenty of dynamic range to pull out detail in the highlights and shadows. The sun dipped behind the tree-line, signalling my time was up. I was pleased with the results when I was able to look at the image on my big screen back in Edmonton.

This image, for me, captures the feel of an evening on the Carolina coast. Warm light, Spanish moss, salty marshes, and huge live oaks are characteristic of the region. I am happy I was able to make an image that seems wild and untouched in an area so densely developed and over-overpopulated. It’s the natural South in a single frame.

“I think a photograph, of whatever it might be – a landscape, a person – requires personal involvement. That means knowing your subject, not just snapping away at what’s in front of you.” - Frans Lanting