5 Awesome Photo Locations in Banff

5 AWESOME PHOTO LOCATIONS IN BANFF NATIONAL PARK

Banff National Park needs little introduction. It is one of the most popular destinations in North America and is home to some of the most photographed natural scenes in Canada if not on earth. As a travel photographer, there is the constant challenge of dealing with large crowds and attempting to get unique shots of heavily photographed areas. It can be rather exhausting - both the effort and natural beauty. In other words, Banff is one of those iconic places (much like Iceland) that are so naturally stunning that it can be emotionally taxing when taking in all the beautiful landscapes. Crowds or not, it's worth the trip. 

I've visited Banff NP three times now. The most recent trip was with my wife. We also visited a couple of the rocky mountain national parks in British Columbia over a long weekend (Kootenay and Glacier), and saved Banff, Alberta for our last full day. In that one day we experienced three seasons of weather: everything from sunny autumn daylight to rain to dark blizzards. October in Banff was quite a different place from the moderate, sunny days I spent there in mid-summer. Nonetheless, a trip to the rockies is always worth it. Here are some of the top (most popular...well-known, etc) photography locations in Banff National Park and my experiences visiting them. 

LAKE LOUISE

 Lake Louise with Snow-capped Mountains, Banff National Park

Lake Louise with Snow-capped Mountains, Banff National Park

Lake Louise is one of the most popular spots in Banff NP. It's easily accessible and surrounded by resorts and lodges. It's a top spot for tour buses and photography workshops. I very much recommend getting there early, especially on holiday weekends. My wife and I first showed up at midday during our Canadian Thanksgiving weekend trip and were surprised to find no parking anywhere near the lake. In fact, there were so many tourists, even the overflow parking 21 kilometers away was almost full and running shuttles to and from Lake Louise! This place is nice, but not worth all that. That's why I say get there early; sunrise on the lake is beautiful, and the trails around Lake Louise will be less trampled earlier in the day. When we showed up again just after sunrise, we managed a parking spot right near the lake. 

I managed to drop my expensive 6-stop neutral density filter into the rocks on the lakeshore while clumsily fiddling with it while wearing gloves. I was trying to soften the movement of the lake surface because the frigid breeze was causing too many ripples for the image I wanted. Unfortunately, the crash resulted in 3 large unfixable scares in the center of the filter...I carried on without it. It's difficult to piss and moan in such awesome surroundings. 

Moraine Lake

 Moraine Lake Sunset, Banff National Park

Moraine Lake Sunset, Banff National Park

Moraine Lake is the next most popular spot in Banff NP. It's about 14 kilometers away from Lake Louise and also near popular resorts. Again, get there early. Sunset is nice, but the sun doesn't set directly behind the mountains, so don't count on a full sky of dramatic color. The sun also doesn't  rise directly in front of them, so the first rays of light only skim the highest peaks of the mountain range. Personally, I think morning is best primarily because you'll likely only run into a few photographers and a hand-full of tourists. Like Lake Louise, the parking lots can fill up fast during peak weekends. Unlike Lake Louise, Moraine Lake only has the one trail to the summit overlooking the lake, lodge, and mountain range. Be careful when clambering over boulders on the summit; there can be ice where you don't expect it and rock pica call this area home. 

Peyto Lake

 Peyto Lake in Autumn Blizzard, Banff National Park

Peyto Lake in Autumn Blizzard, Banff National Park

The image above of Peyto Lake wasn't made in January. It was shot in early-October on the same morning as the Lake Louise image at the top of this page. That's how much weather can vary in the mountains. When my wife and I came to the overlook of Peyto Lake a huge snow cloud came rolling in, covering the mountains and leading to a short white-out. The hike to the Peyto Lake view point is easy and takes about 10 minutes. On this snowy October day, however, it took quite a bit longer with more effort as ice had formed all over the trail and deep snow blanketed the forest. In the summer weeks, beautiful alpine wildflowers carpet the small meadows tucked away in the forest along the trail. Whether you're there in winter or summer, as always, arrive early for sunrise and avoid the crowds. 

 Peyto Lake in Summer, Banff National Park

Peyto Lake in Summer, Banff National Park

To access Peyto Lake, turn at the sign for Bow Summit on the Icefields Parkway and make the next right into the parking area. It's easy to overlook because there is currently no sign indicating Peyto Lake. 

Mistaya Canyon

 Sunrise at Mistaya Canyon, Banff National Park

Sunrise at Mistaya Canyon, Banff National Park

We couldn't squeeze Mistaya Canyon into our full day in Banff NP, but on the early morning drive back through the area on our departure day, I could tell a great sunrise was brewing. I stopped at the pull-off for Mistaya Canyon - no one was around...a first for this trip. I had little time because we needed to make it back to Edmonton to pick up our dogs before the boarding facility closed early for Thanksgiving. I grabbed my tripod with the full frame camera and 18-35mm lens with my polarizer attached, leaving all else in the car (including the Missus who was cold and sleepy). Seeing the sign for Mistaya Canyon in 300 meters, I sprinted the whole way down the rocky trail. When I arrived at the canyon I was stunned. It is easily one of the most beautiful spots for morning landscape photography in Banff, and I had it all to myself for a few short minutes. 

I bounded from cliff to cliff and rock to rock gathering as many different compositions as I could before the bright pink light above the mountain faded. In only 10 minutes I had about 30 shots! It was the perfect way to end the trip as far as photography goes. It would have been nice to have my 6-stop ND...but we'll not bring that up again. 

MOUNT RUNDLE

 Mount Rundle, Town of Banff

Mount Rundle, Town of Banff

The image above of Mount Rundle is a "reference shot." In other words, I'm going to return during better light (probably sunrise as you might have guessed) and shoot from this same viewpoint. This image was made in the late afternoon on the last full day of our Banff trip. We had gone into the town of Banff for lunch (pancakes, pancakes, and more pancakes) and to explore the town a bit before our drive back to the B.C. side of the mountains and our tiny Airbnb. The town itself is a pretty typical mountain resort town, full of overdressed tourists, t-shirt stores, and expensive outdoor gear shops. The best thing about it is it's surroundings within the beautiful Canadian Rockies. This view of Mount Rundle is easily accessible from downtown Banff via Vermillion Lakes Road. There are various convenient spots to pull over and see the lakes and mountains along the short road, which eventually dead-ends at a cul-du-sac. The autumn color is particularly strong here. Mount Rundle is one of Banff's many iconic scenes and is a popular spot to photograph in winter when the lake is frozen.

 

Map of Banff National Park Area:

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Top 5 Photography Locations in Banff National Park

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