Nature

Seasonal Transitions, White-tailed Jackrabbit

Sometimes I don’t have to go far for wildlife opportunities. I live in a city of almost a million people, yet native animals can be found right outside my door. Alberta’s white-tailed jackrabbits have suffered habitat loss due to farming on the prairies, but are thriving in the city limits where they have few predators and an abundance of food. As long as they watch for traffic, they have little to fear on the streets of Edmonton, even in the town’s most populated neighbourhoods.

In winter, these large hares are pristine white and blend in with the snow perfectly. In spring, just as the snow melts and muddy earth tones return, the rabbit’s fur changes along with it, gradually changing from winter white to brown.

White-tailed Jackrabbit in spring, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (Nikon D750,  Nikon 200-500mm f5.6 VR , 500mm, f/5.6, 1/1000 sec, ISO 1600)

White-tailed Jackrabbit in spring, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (Nikon D750, Nikon 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f/5.6, 1/1000 sec, ISO 1600)

Fine Art Prints Are Now Available!

I’m happy to announce that I finally have a selection of my work in the Saatchi Art store. Fine art prints of my photographs are now available in various canvas and print sizes. There are framing options available as well. I will be updating the portfolio frequently. Please take a moment to browse the current selection of images by clicking below!

Nikon 200-500 f5.6 VR Lens One Year Later

It’s been just over a year since I got my hands on what has become an essential part of my lens arsenal. The Nikon 200-500mm f5.6 VR is probably my favourite lens for wildlife. It’s so versatile. Though the newer 500mm f5.6E PF is tempting me, it lacks the versatile zoom range of the 200-500mm (and it’s twice the price). I’ve used the 200-500mm f5.6 VR for the vast majority of my wildlife shots (and a lot of landscapes as well) over the last year. I’d like to celebrate this anniversary by sharing a few of my favourite shots that I’ve made using this lens. You can read my full review by clicking here.
Thanks for reading and happy shooting!

Grizzly grazing in the estuary, Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f6.3, 1/800 sec, ISO 4000)

Grizzly grazing in the estuary, Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f6.3, 1/800 sec, ISO 4000)

Grizzly cub resting by the estuary in low tide, Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f6.3, 1/800 sec, ISO 2500)

Grizzly cub resting by the estuary in low tide, Khutzeymateen Inlet, British Columbia (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f6.3, 1/800 sec, ISO 2500)

Mountain goat nanny and kid looking over the Athabasca River, Jasper National Park (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f.8, 1/2500 sec, ISO 500)

Mountain goat nanny and kid looking over the Athabasca River, Jasper National Park (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f.8, 1/2500 sec, ISO 500)

Bison shaking off snow, Elk Island National Park (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 290mm, f8, 1/400 sec, ISO 800)

Bison shaking off snow, Elk Island National Park (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 290mm, f8, 1/400 sec, ISO 800)

Canada goose goslings, Elk Island National Park (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f8, 1/800 sec, ISO 400)

Canada goose goslings, Elk Island National Park (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f8, 1/800 sec, ISO 400)

White-tailed Jackrabbits, Alberta, Canada (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 290mm, f7.1, 1/1600 sec, ISO 400)

White-tailed Jackrabbits, Alberta, Canada (Nikon D7200, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 290mm, f7.1, 1/1600 sec, ISO 400)

Elk in snow, Banff National Park (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 1800)

Elk in snow, Banff National Park (Nikon D750, 200-500mm f5.6 VR, 500mm, f5.6, 1/800 sec, ISO 1800)

Camping in Dinosaur Provincial Park

Dinosaur Provincial Park has been on my radar since before I even moved to Alberta last year. I finally decided to make the 6 hour drive from Edmonton as soon as the first warm days of spring arrived. It was primarily a scouting trip. I wanted to see what the place was like before tourist season and get a feel for the area before I return for a longer trip - probably in the late summer of this year when the shrubby plants are green. The last days of April were perfect for scouting photo locations. I was actually the only person camped in Dinosaur for the duration of my visit. I had all the trails to myself and was blessed with excellent light and clear blue skies. 

My campsite in Dinosaur Provincial Park. I had the whole Provincial Park all to myself for two days in late April. Though daytime temps can be very warm in spring, I found out the hard way that nighttime lows can still be below freezing.

My campsite in Dinosaur Provincial Park. I had the whole Provincial Park all to myself for two days in late April. Though daytime temps can be very warm in spring, I found out the hard way that nighttime lows can still be below freezing.

I'm a paleontology nerd since childhood. So, of course I stopped in Drumheller along the way to visit the Royal Tyrell Museum - one of the best Dinosaur museums in the world. I geeked out over dino skeletons and fossils for about an hour and then hit the road through the vast Alberta prairie. Dinosaur Provincial Park is one of the most significant fossil beds on earth. At the time of this writing, a more diverse collection of ancient life has been found there than anywhere else. I didn't spot any fossils on my hikes through the sandstone hills and hoodoos; I was more focused on the light and land forms. 

Though it was a short visit, I came away with several good images. Beautiful golden morning and evening light bathed the desolate landscape and brought contrast to the folds and creases of unique land formations. I found myself huffing and puffing as I quickly clambered over hills and up steep escarpments to find compositions before the light faded. I'd never been to an environment like Dinosaur before. I was completely inspired by it- everything was new and exciting. I can't wait for the next trip!

For more information on Dinosaur Provincial Park, visit the Alberta Parks website: https://www.albertaparks.ca/parks/south/dinosaur-pp/